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Uluru

Photo: Low cloud coverage over Uluru.

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Central Australia

The Alice Springs district encompasses the area from the South Australia/Northern Territory border, north to Wilowra (including Lake Nash and the Tanami Desert), and from the Queensland/Northern Territory Border west to the Northern Territory/West Australia border

Alice Springs District

The Alice Springs district encompasses the area from the South Australia/Northern Territory border, north to Wilowra (including Lake Nash and the Tanami Desert), and from the Queensland/Northern Territory Border west to the Northern Territory/West Australia border.

Weather:

In central Australia, the climate is highly seasonal. Drought is a feature of the history of this land, but heavy rainfalls, often associated with distant cyclonic activity, also occur and may result in sudden flood events in the desert.

Central Australia experiences a semi-arid climate experiencing Australia’s four typical seasons: summer, autumn, winter and spring.
Temperatures in Central Australia may become very hot (more than 40 degrees Celsius) in the summer months, and very cold (-10 degrees Celsius) in the winter.

Events:

Aileron Bush Weekend, Alice Springs Cup Carnival, Alice Springs Masters Games, Rodeaos, Anaconda MTB Enduro, Imparja Camel Cup, Finke Desert Race, Alice Springs Beanie Festival.

Landscape:

The heart of Central Australia comprises cavernous gorges, boundless desert landscapes and remote Aboriginal communities.

Places to see:

Uluru, Kata Tjuta (the Olgas), Kings Canyon, Finke Gorge National Park, Hermannsburg district, MacDonnell Ranges and the Simpson and Tanami Deserts to name a few.

Things to do:

There is bushwalking, mountain bike racing, horse racing, four wheel driving, camping, bird watching, numerous sports clubs or community services, hot air ballooning, quad biking or fossicking for gems to name a few.

Culture:

The traditional owners of the Alice Springs area are the Central Arrernte people.

The most common non-English languages spoken in Alice Springs are: Arrernte, Walpiri, Luritja, Pitjantjatjara and Italian.
Many Aboriginal people from outlying communities visit Alice Springs regularly to access services in the town. Several small immigrant cultural communities have found a home in Alice Springs, including Vietnamese, Chinese, Thai, German and Turkish ethnic groups.
There are up to 2,000 Americans in the Alice Springs district, mainly associated with Pine Gap, a joint Australian and U.S. satellite tracking station.

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"The heart of Central Australia comprises cavernous gorges, boundless desert landscapes and remote Aboriginal communities."

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